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Sketch Recognition Lab
Director: Dr. Tracy Anne Hammond

SRL Journals


 


Journals


PublicationImage 2018 Tracy Hammond, Shalini Ashok Kumar, Matthew Runyon, Josh Cherian, Blake Williford, Swarna Keshavabhotla, Stephanie Valentine, Wayne Li, and Julie Linsey. 2018. "It's Not Just About Accuracy: Metrics that Matter when Modeling Expert Sketching Ability." {ACM} Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TIIS). New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2018.
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@article{tracyhammondshaliniashokkumarmatthewrunyonjoshcherianblakewillifordswarnakeshavabhotlastephanievalentinewaynelijulielinsey2018Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Ashok Kumar, Shalini and Runyon, Matthew and Cherian, Josh and Williford, Blake and Keshavabhotla, Swarna and Valentine, Stephanie and Li, Wayne and Linsey, Julie},
title = {It's Not Just About Accuracy: Metrics that Matter when Modeling Expert Sketching Ability},
journal = {{ACM} Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TIIS)},
year = {2018},
publisher = {ACM},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
}
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PublicationImage 2018 Ethan Hilton, Wayne Li, Tracy Hammond, and Julie Linsey. 2018. "Effectively teaching sketching in engineering curricula." International Journal of Engineering Education. 2018.
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@article{ethanhiltonwaynelitracyhammondjulielinsey2018Journals,
author = {Hilton, Ethan and Li, Wayne and Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {Effectively teaching sketching in engineering curricula},
journal = {International Journal of Engineering Education},
year = {2018},
}
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PublicationImage 2017 Jennifer Horney, Daniel Goldberg, Tracy Hammond, Kahler Stone, and Seth Smitherman. 2017. "Assessing the Prevalence of Risk Factors for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Brazos County, Texas." PLOS Current Outbreaks. Volume 1, San Francisco, CA, USA: Plos, October 4, 2017. 10.1371/currents.outbreaks.93540c6c8c7831670591b0264479269c http://currents.plos.org/outbreaks/article/assessing-the-prevalence-of-risk-factors-for-neglected-tropical-diseases-in-brazos-county-texas/
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Introduction: Although more than one billion people live at risk of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in areas of Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America, the degree to which they burden countries like the U.S. is unclear. Even though many NTDs such as dengue, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease are typically not endemic to the U.S., the possibility of their emergence is noteworthy, especially in states like Texas with high levels of poverty, large immigrant populations, geographic proximity to endemic areas, and a climate amenable to the vectors for these diseases. Despite the health threat that emerging NTDs may pose, little is known about the prevalence of risk factors for NTDs in the U.S. Methods: We tested the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) method to assess the prevalence of risk factors for NTDs in Brazos County, Texas. Results: We found relatively low prevalence of risk factors related to travel (5.2% of respondents visited an endemic area in the previous 3 months); however, few respondents reported adherence to mosquito prevention, such as wearing long sleeves and long pants (14.1%, 95% CI: 13.9,14.4) and repellant containing DEET (13.5%, 95% CI: 13.2,13.7). Between 5.4% and 35.8% of respondents had a visible container (e.g., pet water dishes, flower pots, bird baths) that could support mosquito breeding.Discussion: CASPER findings present public health authorities with potential avenues for implementing health education and other interventions aimed at reducing exposure to risk factors for NTDs among Texas residents.

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@article{jenniferhorneydanielgoldbergtracyhammondkahlerstonesethsmitherman2017Journals,
author = {Horney, Jennifer and Goldberg, Daniel and Hammond, Tracy and Stone, Kahler and Smitherman, Seth},
title = {Assessing the Prevalence of Risk Factors for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Brazos County, Texas},
journal = {PLOS Current Outbreaks},
volume = {1},
year = {2017},
month = {October 4, },
publisher = {Plos},
address = {San Francisco, CA, USA},
note = {DOI: 10.1371/currents.outbreaks.93540c6c8c7831670591b0264479269c},
}
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PublicationImage 2017 Seth Smitherman, Daniel Goldberg, Tracy Hammond, and Jennifer Horney. 2017. "A Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response survey to assess the prevalence of risk factors for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Texas." Health Security. Volume 15-3, Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE, June 2017. pp. 238-243. ISBN: ISSN: 2326-5094. 10.1089/hs.2016.0075 https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2016.0075 http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/hs.2016.0075
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While more than a billion people live at risk of neglected tropical diseases in areas of Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America, the degree to which such diseases burden countries like the United States is currently unclear. Even though many neglected tropical diseases such as dengue, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease are not endemic to the United States, the possibility of their emergence is noteworthy, especially in states like Texas, which has high levels of poverty, a large immigrant population, and a climate amenable to the vectors for these diseases and is geographically proximate to endemic areas. Despite the health threat that emerging neglected tropical diseases may pose, little is known about the prevalence of risk factors for them in the United States. Texas House Bill 2055, enacted on September 1, 2015, mandated the establishment of a surveillance program for neglected tropical diseases in Texas. After reviewing the potential risk factors for transmission in Texas, we developed a 41-question survey that could be implemented using the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) method. In concert with public health surveillance and vector population monitoring, data from CASPERs could be used to quickly and cost-effectively assess the prevalence of risk factors for 10 neglected tropical diseases in Texas or elsewhere in the United States. The data generated by future CASPERs conducted using this survey could be immediately actionable, guiding public health priority setting and decision making.

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@article{sethsmithermandanielgoldbergtracyhammondjenniferhorney2017Journals,
author = {Smitherman, Seth and Goldberg, Daniel and Hammond, Tracy and Horney, Jennifer},
title = {A Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response survey to assess the prevalence of risk factors for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Texas},
journal = {Health Security},
volume = {15-3},
pages = {238-243},
year = {2017},
month = {June},
publisher = {IEEE},
address = {Piscataway, NJ, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2326-5094, \url{https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2016.0075}},
}
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PublicationImage 2017 Jaideep Ray, Seth Polsley, and Tracy Hammond. 2017. "SketchSeeker : Finding Similar Sketches." IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems. Volume 47-2, Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE, April 2017. pp. 194-205. ISBN: ISSN: 2168-2291. 10.1109/THMS.2017.2649684 https://doi.org/10.1109/THMS.2017.2649684 http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7833166/
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Searching is a necessary tool for managing and navigating the massive amounts of data available in today's information age. While new searching methods have become increasingly popular and reliable in recent years, such as image-based searching, these methods may be more limited than text-based means in that they do not allow generic user input. Sketch-based searching is a method that allows users to draw generic search queries and return similar drawn images, giving more user control over their search content. In this paper, we present SketchSeeker, a system for indexing and searching across a large number of sketches quickly based on their similarity. SketchSeeker introduces a technique for indexing sketches in extremely compressed representations, which allows for fast, accurate retrieval augmented with a multilevel ranking subsystem. SketchSeeker was tested on a large set of sketches against existing sketch similarity metrics, and it shows significant improvements in terms of storage requirements, speed, and accuracy.

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@article{jaideepraysethpolsleytracyhammond2017Journals,
author = {Ray, Jaideep and Polsley, Seth and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {SketchSeeker : Finding Similar Sketches},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems},
volume = {47-2},
pages = {194-205},
year = {2017},
month = {April},
publisher = {IEEE},
address = {Piscataway, NJ, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2168-2291, \url{https://doi.org/10.1109/THMS.2017.2649684}},
}
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PublicationImage 2017 Folami Alamudun, Hong-Jun Yoon, Kathleen Hudson, Garnetta Morin-Ducote, Tracy Hammond, and Georgia Tourassi. 2017. "Fractal Analysis of Visual Search Activity for Mass Detection During Mammographic Screening." Medical Physics . Volume 44-3, Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley, February 21, 2017. pp. 832-846. ISBN: ISSN: 2473-4209. 10.1002/mp.12100 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mp.12100 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mp.12100/full
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The objective of this study was to assess the complexity of human visual search activity during mammographic screening using fractal analysis and to investigate its relationship with case and reader characteristics. The study was performed for the task of mammographic screening with simultaneous viewing of four coordinated breast views as typically done in clinical practice. Eye-tracking data and diagnostic decisions collected for 100 mammographic cases (25 normal, 25 benign, 50 malignant) from 10 readers (three board certified radiologists and seven Radiology residents), formed the corpus for this study. The fractal dimension of the readers' visual scanning pattern was computed with the Minkowski–Bouligand box-counting method and used as a measure of gaze complexity. Individual factor and group-based interaction ANOVA analysis was performed to study the association between fractal dimension, case pathology, breast density, and reader experience level. The consistency of the observed trends depending on gaze data representation was also examined. Case pathology, breast density, reader experience level, and individual reader differences are all independent predictors of the complexity of visual scanning pattern when screening for breast cancer. No higher order effects were found to be significant. Fractal characterization of visual search behavior during mammographic screening is dependent on case properties and image reader characteristics.

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@article{folamialamudunhongjunyoonkathleenhudsongarnettamorinducotetracyhammondgeorgiatourassi2017Journals,
author = {Alamudun, Folami and Yoon, Hong-Jun and Hudson, Kathleen and Morin-Ducote, Garnetta and Hammond, Tracy and Tourassi, Georgia},
title = {Fractal Analysis of Visual Search Activity for Mass Detection During Mammographic Screening},
journal = {Medical Physics },
volume = {44-3},
pages = {832-846},
year = {2017},
month = {February 21,},
publisher = {Wiley},
address = {Hoboken, NJ, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2473-4209, \url{http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mp.12100}},
}
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PublicationImage 2016 Shiqiang (Frank) Guo, Folami Alamudun, and Tracy Hammond. 2016. "R\`esuMatcher: A personalized r\`esum\`e-job matching system." Expert Systems with Applications. Volume 60, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier, October 30, 2016. pp. 169-182. ISBN: ISSN: 0957-4174. 10.1016/j.eswa.2016.04.013 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eswa.2016.04.013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0957417416301798?via%3Dihub
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Online jobs search through popular websites are quite beneficial having served for any years as a prominent tool for job seekers and employers alike. In spite of their valuable utility in linking employers with potential employees, the search process and technology utilized by job search websites have not kept pace with the rapid changes in computing capability and machine intelligence. The Information retrieval techniques utilized by these websites rely primarily on variants of manually entered search queries with some advanced similarity metrics for ranking search results.Advancements in machine intelligence techniques have enabled programmatic extraction of pertinent information about the job seeker and job postings without active user input. To this end, we developed a resume matching system, RésuMatcher, which intelligently extracts the qualifications and experience of a job seeker directly from his/her résumé, and relevant information about the qualifications and experience requirements of job postings. Using a novel statistical similarity index, RésuMatcher returns results that are more relevant to the job seekers experience, academic, and technical qualifications, with minimal active user input.Our method provides up to a 34% improvement over existing information retrieval methods in the quality of search results. In addition however, RésuMatcher requires minimal active user input to search for jobs, compared to traditional manual search-based methods prevalent today. These improvements, we hypothesize, will lead to more relevant job search results and a better overall job search experience for job seekers. As an alternative to the fragmented organization-centric job application process, job recruitment websites offered the promise of simplifying and streamlining the job search process. However, these websites offer limited functionality using generic and simplistic information retrieval methods, which being non-domain lead to a poor and frustrating search experience. In this paper, we present RésuMatcher, a personalized job-résumé matching system, which offers a novel statistical similarity index for ranking relevance between candidate résumés and a database of available jobs. In our experiments we show that our method offers a 37.44% improvement over existing information retrieval methods in the quality of matches returned.

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@article{shiqiangguofolamialamuduntracyhammond2016Journals,
author = {Guo, Shiqiang (Frank) and Alamudun, Folami and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {R\`esuMatcher: A personalized r\`esum\`e-job matching system},
journal = {Expert Systems with Applications},
volume = {60},
pages = {169-182},
year = {2016},
month = {October 30,},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 0957-4174, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eswa.2016.04.013}},
}
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PublicationImage 2016 Vijay Rajanna, Patrick Vo, Jerry Barth, Matthew Mjelde, Trevor Gray, Cassandra Oduola, and Tracy Hammond. 2016. "KinoHaptics: An Automated, Wearable, Haptic Assisted, Physio-therapeutic System for Post-surgery Rehabilitation and Self-care." Journal of Medical Systems. Volume 40-3, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer, March 2016. pp. 1-12. ISBN: ISSN: 0148-5598. 10.1007/s10916-015-0391-3 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10916-015-0391-3 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10916-015-0391-3
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A carefully planned, structured, and supervised physiotherapy program, following a surgery, is crucial for the successful diagnosis of physical injuries. Nearly 50 % of the surgeries fail due to unsupervised, and erroneous physiotherapy. The demand for a physiotherapist for an extended period is expensive to afford, and sometimes inaccessible. Researchers have tried to leverage the advancements in wearable sensors and motion tracking by building affordable, automated, physio-therapeutic systems that direct a physiotherapy session by providing audio-visual feedback on patient’s performance. There are many aspects of automated physiotherapy program which are yet to be addressed by the existing systems: a wide classification of patients’ physiological conditions to be diagnosed, multiple demographics of the patients (blind, deaf, etc.), and the need to pursue patients to adopt the system for an extended period for self-care. In our research, we have tried to address these aspects by building a health behavior change support system called KinoHaptics, for post-surgery rehabilitation. KinoHaptics is an automated, wearable, haptic assisted, physio-therapeutic system that can be used by a wide variety of demographics and for various physiological conditions of the patients. The system provides rich and accurate vibro-haptic feedback that can be felt by the user, irrespective of the physiological limitations. KinoHaptics is built to ensure that no injuries are induced during the rehabilitation period. The persuasive nature of the system allows for personal goal-setting, progress tracking, and most importantly life-style compatibility. The system was evaluated under laboratory conditions, involving 14 users. Results show that KinoHaptics is highly convenient to use, and the vibro-haptic feedback is intuitive, accurate, and has shown to prevent accidental injuries. Also, results show that KinoHaptics is persuasive in nature as it supports behavior change and habit building. The successful acceptance of KinoHaptics, an automated, wearable, haptic assisted, physio-therapeutic system proves the need and future-scope of automated physio-therapeutic systems for self-care and behavior change. It also proves that such systems incorporated with vibro-haptic feedback encourage strong adherence to the physiotherapy program; can have profound impact on the physiotherapy experience resulting in higher acceptance rate.

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@article{vijayrajannapatrickvojerrybarthmatthewmjeldetrevorgraycassandraoduolatracyhammond2016Journals,
author = {Rajanna, Vijay and Vo, Patrick and Barth, Jerry and Mjelde, Matthew and Gray, Trevor and Oduola, Cassandra and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {KinoHaptics: An Automated, Wearable, Haptic Assisted, Physio-therapeutic System for Post-surgery Rehabilitation and Self-care},
journal = {Journal of Medical Systems},
volume = {40-3},
pages = {1-12},
year = {2016},
month = {March},
publisher = {Springer},
address = {Heidelberg, Germany},
note = {ISSN: 0148-5598, \url{https://doi.org/10.1007/s10916-015-0391-3}},
}
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PublicationImage 2016 Stephanie Valentine and Tracy Hammond. 2016. "An Analysis of Participation, Identity Conversations, and Social Networking Affordances on an Online Social Network for Children." Journal of Media Innovations. Volume 3-1, Oslo, Norway: University of Oslo Library, 2016. pp. 41-62. ISBN: ISSN: 1894-5562. 10.5617/jmi.v3i1.2516 http://dx.doi.org/10.5617/jmi.v3i1.2516 https://www.journals.uio.no/index.php/TJMI/article/view/2516
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In this study, we explore the behaviors of children ages 7 to 12 years on our custom social network, KidGab, to understand the activities that increase participation and identity-related conversation. We specifically study the effects of two social networking affordances provided by KidGab: a suite of personality quizzes and a badge-based participatory reward system. Both affordances harness the preadolescent’s internal focus on identity exploration. We analyzed KidGab’s activity logs in an attempt to understand the relationships between activities on these affordances and other engagement measured on the site (e.g., the total posts authored on KidGab per day, total comments authored per day, likes per day, etc.). We also investigate the amount of conversation relating to identity that accompanies quizzes and badges. We found that taking quizzes and posting results had a higher positive correlation with online participation on KidGab than attempting to earn badges. Our results suggest that, though youth are interested in self-reflecting via textual compositions, on a daily basis they partake more in personality-quiz-style activities that provide them instant feedback and shared experiences with other users.

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@article{stephanievalentinetracyhammond2016Journals,
author = {Valentine, Stephanie and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {An Analysis of Participation, Identity Conversations, and Social Networking Affordances on an Online Social Network for Children},
journal = {Journal of Media Innovations},
volume = {3-1},
pages = {41-62},
year = {2016},
publisher = {University of Oslo Library},
address = {Oslo, Norway},
note = {ISSN: 1894-5562, \url{http://dx.doi.org/10.5617/jmi.v3i1.2516}},
}
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PublicationImage 2014 Manoj Prasad, Murat Russell, and Tracy Hammond. 2014. "Designing Vibrotactile Codes to Communicate Verb Phrases." ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMM). Volume 11-1, New York, NY, USA: ACM, September 2014. pp. 11:1--11:21. ISBN: ISSN: 1551-6857. 10.1145/2637289 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2637289 https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2637289
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Soldiers, to guard themselves from enemy assault, have to maintain visual and auditory awareness of their environment. Their visual and auditory senses are thus saturated. This makes these channels less usable for communication. The tactile medium of communication with users is appropriate for displaying information in such situations. Research in interpersonal communication among soldiers shows that the most common form of communication between soldiers involves the use of verb phrases. In this article, we have developed a three-by-three tactile display and proposed a method for mapping the components of a verb phrase to two dimensions of tactile codes—shape and waveform. Perception of tactile codes by users depends on the ability of users to distinguish shape and waveform of the code. We have proposed a measure to rate the distinguish-ability of any two shapes and created a graph-based user-centric model using this measure to select distinguishable shapes from a set of all presentable shapes. We conducted two user studies to evaluate the ability of users to perceive tactile information. The results from our first study showed users' ability to perceive tactile shapes, tactile waveforms, and form verb phrases from tactile codes. The recognition accuracy and time taken to distinguish were better when the shapes were selected from the graph model than when shapes were chosen based on intuition. The second user study was conducted to test the performance of users while performing a primary visual task simultaneously with a secondary audio or haptic task. Users were more familiar with perceiving information from an auditory medium than from a haptic medium, which was reflected in their performance. Thus the performance of users in the primary visual task was better while using an audio medium of communication than while using a haptic medium of communication.

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@article{manojprasadmuratrusselltracyhammond2014Journals,
author = {Prasad, Manoj and Russell, Murat and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Designing Vibrotactile Codes to Communicate Verb Phrases},
journal = {ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMM)},
volume = {11-1},
pages = {11:1--11:21},
year = {2014},
month = {September},
publisher = {ACM},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1551-6857, \url{http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2637289}},
}
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PublicationImage 2014 Olufunmilola Atilola, Stephanie Valentine, Hong-Hoe (Ayden) Kim, David Turner, Erin McTigue, Tracy Hammond, and Julie Linsey. 2014. "Mechanix: A natural sketch interface tool for teaching truss analysis and free-body diagrams." Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (AIEDAM). Volume 28-2, New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, May 2014. pp. 169-192. ISBN: ISSN: 1469-1760. 10.1017/S0890060414000079 https://doi.org/10.1017/S0890060414000079 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9261160&fileId=S0890060414000079
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Massive open online courses, online tutoring systems, and other computer homework systems are rapidly changing engineering education by providing increased student feedback and capitalizing upon online systems' scalability. While online homework systems provide great benefits, a growing concern among engineering educators is that students are losing both the critical art of sketching and the ability to take a real system and reduce it to an accurate but simplified free-body diagram (FBD). For example, some online systems allow the drag and drop of forces onto FBDs, but they do not allow the user to sketch the FBDs, which is a vital part of the learning process. In this paper, we discuss Mechanix, a sketch recognition tool that provides an efficient means for engineering students to learn how to draw truss FBDs and solve truss problems. The system allows students to sketch FBDs into a tablet computer or by using a mouse and a standard computer monitor. Using artificial intelligence, Mechanix can determine not only the component shapes and features of the diagram but also the relationships between those shapes and features. Because Mechanix is domain specific, it can use those relationships to determine not only whether a student's work is correct but also why it is incorrect. Mechanix is then able to provide immediate, constructive feedback to students without providing final answers. Within this manuscript, we document the inner workings of Mechanix, including the artificial intelligence behind the scenes, and present studies of the effects on student learning. The evaluations have shown that Mechanix is as effective as paper-and-pencil-based homework for teaching method of joints truss analysis; focus groups with students who used the program have revealed that they believe Mechanix enhances their learning and that they are highly engaged while using it.

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@article{funmiatilolastephanievalentinehonghoekimdavidturnererinmctiguetracyhammondjulielinsey2014Journals,
author = {Atilola, Olufunmilola and Valentine, Stephanie and Kim, Hong-Hoe (Ayden) and Turner, David and McTigue, Erin and Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {Mechanix: A natural sketch interface tool for teaching truss analysis and free-body diagrams},
journal = {Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (AIEDAM)},
volume = {28-2},
pages = {169-192},
year = {2014},
month = {May},
publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1469-1760, \url{https://doi.org/10.1017/S0890060414000079}},
}
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PublicationImage 2014 Tracy Hammond and Julie Linsey. 2014. "Design Computing and Cognition (DCC'12) Special Issue." Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (AIEDAM). Volume 28-2, New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, May 2014. pp. 113-114. ISBN: ISSN: 1469-1760. 10.1017/S089006041400002X https://doi.org/10.1017/S089006041400002X http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9261145&fileId=S089006041400002X
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The Fifth International Conference on Design Computing was held at Texas A&M University in College Statin, Texas on June 7--9, 2012 (Gero, in press). The Main conferences was preceded by six workshops.

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@article{tracyhammondjulielinsey2014Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {Design Computing and Cognition (DCC'12) Special Issue},
journal = {Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (AIEDAM)},
volume = {28-2},
pages = {113-114},
year = {2014},
month = {May},
publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1469-1760, \url{https://doi.org/10.1017/S089006041400002X}},
}
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PublicationImage 2013 Tracy Hammond and Julie Linsey. 2013. "AIEDAM Special Issue Call For Papers, May 2014, Vol. 28, No. 2." Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing. Volume 27-1, New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, February 2013. pp. 83-84. ISBN: ISSN: 1469-1760. 10.1017/S089006041200039X https://doi.org/10.1017/S089006041200039X https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/ai-edam/article/ai-edam-special-issue-may-2014-vol-28-no-2/4B0C015EF823A214973BE0228709CAB7
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The Special Issue of AI EDAM presents cutting edge, state-of-the-art research in design computing and cognition from DCC'12, the Fifth International Conference n Design Computing & Cognition.

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@article{tracyhammondjulielinsey2013Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {AIEDAM Special Issue Call For Papers, May 2014, Vol. 28, No. 2},
journal = {Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing},
volume = {27-1},
pages = {83-84},
year = {2013},
month = {February},
publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1469-1760, \url{https://doi.org/10.1017/S089006041200039X}},
}
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PublicationImage 2013 Stephanie Valentine, Francisco Vides, George Lucchese, David Turner, Hong-Hoe (Ayden) Kim, Wenzhe Li, Julie Linsey, and Tracy Hammond. 2013. "Mechanix: A Sketch-Based Tutoring and Grading System for Free-Body Diagrams." AI Magazine. Volume 34-1, Palo Alto, CA, USA: AAAI Press, January 2013. pp. 55-66. 10.1609/aimag.v34i1.2437 https://doi.org/10.1609/aimag.v34i1.2437 http://www.aaai.org/ojs/index.php/aimagazine/article/view/2437/2347
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Introductory engineering courses within large universities often have annual enrollments that can reach up to a thousand students. In this article, we introduce Mechanix, a sketch-based deployed tutoring system for engineering students enrolled in statics courses. Our system not only allows students to enter planar trussand free-body diagrams into the system, just as they would with pencil and paper, but our system also checks the student’s work against a hand-drawn answer entered by the instructor, and then returns immediate and detailed feedback to the student. Students are allowed to correct any errors in their work and resubmit until the entire content is correct and thus all of the objectives are learned. Since Mechanix facilitates the grading and feedback processes, instructors are now able to assign more free-response questions, increasing teacher’s knowledge of student comprehension. Furthermore, the iterative correction process allows students to learn during a test, rather than simply display memorized information.

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@article{stephanievalentinefranciscovidesgeorgelucchesedavidturnerhonghoekimwenzhelijulielinseytracyhammond2013Journals,
author = {Valentine, Stephanie and Vides, Francisco and Lucchese, George and Turner, David and Kim, Hong-Hoe (Ayden) and Li, Wenzhe and Linsey, Julie and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Mechanix: A Sketch-Based Tutoring and Grading System for Free-Body Diagrams},
journal = {AI Magazine},
volume = {34-1},
pages = {55-66},
year = {2013},
month = {January},
publisher = {AAAI Press},
address = {Palo Alto, CA, USA},
note = {\url{https://doi.org/10.1609/aimag.v34i1.2437}},
}
PublicationImagePublicationImagePublicationImage
PublicationImagePublicationImagePublicationImage
PublicationImagePublicationImage
 
PublicationImage 2011 Tracy Hammond and Brandon Paulson. 2011. "Recognizing Sketched Multistroke Primitives." ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TIIS). Volume 1-4, New York, NY, USA: ACM, October 2011. pp. 1-34. ISBN: ISSN: 2160-6455. 10.1145/2030365.2030369 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2030365.2030369 http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2030369
Show Abstract:

Sketch recognition attempts to interpret the hand-sketched markings made by users on an electronic medium. Through recognition, sketches and diagrams can be interpreted and sent to simulators or other meaningful analyzers. Primitives are the basic building block shapes used by high-level visual grammars to describe the symbols of a given sketch domain. However, one limitation of these primitive recognizers is that they often only support basic shapes drawn with a single stroke. Furthermore, recognizers that do support multistroke primitives place additional constraints on users, such as temporal timeouts or modal button presses to signal shape completion. The goal of this research is twofold. First, we wanted to determine the drawing habits of most users. Our studies found multistroke primitives to be more prevalent than multiple primitives drawn in a single stroke. Additionally, our studies confirmed that threading is less frequent when there are more sides to a figure. Next, we developed an algorithm that is capable of recognizing multistroke primitives without requiring special drawing constraints. The algorithm uses a graph-building and search technique that takes advantage of Tarjan's linear search algorithm, along with principles to determine the goodness of a fit. Our novel, constraint-free recognizer achieves accuracy rates of 96% on freely-drawn primitives.

Show BibTex

@article{tracyhammondbrandonpaulson2011Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Paulson, Brandon},
title = {Recognizing Sketched Multistroke Primitives},
journal = {ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TIIS)},
volume = {1-4},
pages = {1-34},
year = {2011},
month = {October},
publisher = {ACM},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2160-6455, \url{http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2030365.2030369}},
}
PublicationImagePublicationImage
 
PublicationImage 2011 Brandon Paulson, Danielle Cummings, and Tracy Hammond. 2011. "Object Interaction Detection Using Hand Posture Cues in an Office Setting." International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS). Volume 69-1, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier, January 2011. pp. 19-29. ISBN: ISSN: 1071-5819. 10.1016/j.ijhcs.2010.09.003 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhcs.2010.09.003 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1071581910001229?via%3Dihub
Show Abstract:

Activity recognition plays a key role in providing information for context-aware applications. When attempting to model activities, some researchers have looked towards Activity Theory, which theorizes that activities have objectives and are accomplished through interactions with tools and objects. The goal of this paper is to determine if hand posture can be used as a cue to determine the types of interactions a user has with objects in a desk/office environment. Furthermore, we wish to determine if hand posture is user-independent across all users when interacting with the same objects in a natural manner. Our experiments indicate that (a) hand posture can be used to determine object interaction, with accuracy rates around 97%, and (b) hand posture is dependent upon the individual user when users are allowed to interact with objects as they would naturally.

Show BibTex

@article{brandonpaulsondaniellecummingstracyhammond2011Journals,
author = {Paulson, Brandon and Cummings, Danielle and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Object Interaction Detection Using Hand Posture Cues in an Office Setting},
journal = {International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS)},
volume = {69-1},
pages = {19-29},
year = {2011},
month = {January},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 1071-5819, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhcs.2010.09.003}},
}
PublicationImagePublicationImagePublicationImage
 
PublicationImage 2010 Gennaro Costagliola, Tracy Hammond, and Beryl Plimmer. 2010. "Editorial: JVLC Special Issue on Sketch Computation." Journal of Visual Languages & Computing (JVLC). Volume 21-2, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier, April 2010. pp. 67-68. ISBN: ISSN: 1045-926X. 10.1016/j.jvlc.2010.01.003 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvlc.2010.01.003 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1045926X10000108?via%3Dihub
Show Abstract:

Sketching is, in essence, a means of quickly visualizing information. You may want to sketch an example of an object to better explain it to a colleague, or the sketch may be an engineering diagram or model of a computer system. While we have powerful computer tools for formally rendering engineering diagrams and diagram modeling, sketching remains the preferred first visualization method for most designers.

Show BibTex

@article{gennarocostagliolatracyhammondberylplimmer2010Journals,
author = {Costagliola, Gennaro and Hammond, Tracy and Plimmer, Beryl},
title = {Editorial: JVLC Special Issue on Sketch Computation},
journal = {Journal of Visual Languages \& Computing (JVLC)},
volume = {21-2},
pages = {67-68},
year = {2010},
month = {April},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 1045-926X, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvlc.2010.01.003}},
}
PublicationImagePublicationImagePublicationImage
 
PublicationImage 2010 Paul Taele and Tracy Hammond. 2010. "LAMPS: A Sketch Recognition-Based Teaching Tool for Mandarin Phonetic Symbols I." Journal of Visual Languages & Computing (JLVC). Volume 21-2, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier, April 2010. pp. 109-120. ISBN: ISSN: 1045-926X. 10.1016/j.jvlc.2009.12.004 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvlc.2009.12.004 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1045926X09000809?via%3Dihub
Show Abstract:

The non-Romanized Mandarin Phonetic Symbols I (MPS1) system is a highly advantageous phonetic system for native English users studying Chinese Mandarin to learn, yet its steep initial learning curve discourages language programs to instead adopt Romanized phonetic systems. Computer-assisted language instruction (CALI) can greatly reduce this learning curve, in order to enable students to sooner benefit from the long-term advantages presented in MPS1 usage during the course of Chinese Mandarin study. Unfortunately, the technologies surrounding existing online handwriting recognition algorithms and CALI applications are insufficient in providing a “dynamic” counterpart to traditional paper-based workbooks employed in the classroom setting. In this paper, we describe our sketch recognition-based LAMPS system for teaching MPS1 by emulating the naturalness and realism of paper-based workbooks, while extending their functionality with human instructor-level critique and assessment at an automated level.

Show BibTex

@article{paultaeletracyhammond2010Journals,
author = {Taele, Paul and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {LAMPS: A Sketch Recognition-Based Teaching Tool for Mandarin Phonetic Symbols I},
journal = {Journal of Visual Languages \& Computing (JLVC)},
volume = {21-2},
pages = {109-120},
year = {2010},
month = {April},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 1045-926X, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvlc.2009.12.004}},
}
PublicationImagePublicationImage
 
PublicationImage 2008 Brandon Paulson and Tracy Hammond. 2008. "Marqs: Retrieving Sketches Learned from a Single Example Using a Dual-Classifier." Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces. Volume 2-1, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag, May 2008. pp. 3-11. ISBN: ISSN: 1783-8738. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12193-008-0006-0 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12193-008-0006-0
Show Abstract:

Mouse and keyboard interfaces handle traditional text-based queries, and standard search engines provide for effective text-based search. However, everyday documents are filled with not only text, but photos, cartoons, diagrams, and sketches. These images can often be easier to recall than the surrounding text. In an effort to make human computer interaction handle more forms of human-human interaction, sketching has recently become an important means of interacting with computer systems. We propose extending the traditional monomodal model of text-based search to include the capabilities of sketch-based search. Our goal is to create a sketch-based search that can find documents from a single query sketch. We imagine an important use for this technology would be to allow users to search a computerized laboratory notebook for a previously drawn sketch. Because such as sketch will have initially been drawn only a single time, it is important that the search-by-sketch system (1) recognize a wide range of shapes that are not necessarily geometric nor drawn in the same way each time, (2) recognize a query example from only one initial training example, and (3) learn from successful queries to improve accuracy over time. We present here such an algorithm. To test the algorithm, we implemented a proof-of-concept-system: MARQS, a system that uses sketches to query existing media albums. Preliminary results show that the system yielded an average search rank of 1.51, indicating that the correct sketch is presented as either the top or second search result on average.

Show BibTex

@article{brandonpaulsontracyhammond2008Journals,
author = {Paulson, Brandon and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Marqs: Retrieving Sketches Learned from a Single Example Using a Dual-Classifier},
journal = {Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces},
volume = {2-1},
pages = {3-11},
year = {2008},
month = {May},
publisher = {Springer-Verlag},
address = {Heidelberg, Germany},
note = {ISSN: 1783-8738, \url{https://doi.org/10.1007/s12193-008-0006-0}},
}
PublicationImagePublicationImage
 
PublicationImage 2005 Tracy Hammond and Randall Davis. 2005. "LADDER, A Sketching Language for User Interface Developers." Computers & Graphics. Volume 29-4, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier, August 2005. pp. 518-532. 10.1016/j.cag.2005.05.005 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cag.2005.05.005 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0097849305000865?via%3Dihub
Show Abstract:

Sketch recognition systems are currently being developed for many domains, but can be time consuming to build if they are to handle the intricacies of each domain. In order to aid sketch-based user interface developers, we have developed tools to simplify the development of a new sketch recognition interface. We created LADDER, a language to describe how sketched diagrams in a domain are drawn, displayed, and edited. We then automatically transform LADDER structural descriptions into domain specific shape recognizers, editing recognizers, and shape exhibitors for use in conjunction with a domain independent sketch recognition system, creating a sketch recognition system for that domain. We have tested our framework by writing several domain descriptions and automatically generating a domain specific sketch recognition system from each description.

Show BibTex

@article{tracyhammondrandalldavis2005Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Davis, Randall},
title = {LADDER, A Sketching Language for User Interface Developers},
journal = {Computers \& Graphics},
volume = {29-4},
pages = {518-532},
year = {2005},
month = {August},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {\url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cag.2005.05.005}},
}
PublicationImagePublicationImage
 





Show All BibTex


@article{tracyhammondshaliniashokkumarmatthewrunyonjoshcherianblakewillifordswarnakeshavabhotlastephanievalentinewaynelijulielinsey2018Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Ashok Kumar, Shalini and Runyon, Matthew and Cherian, Josh and Williford, Blake and Keshavabhotla, Swarna and Valentine, Stephanie and Li, Wayne and Linsey, Julie},
title = {It's Not Just About Accuracy: Metrics that Matter when Modeling Expert Sketching Ability},
journal = {{ACM} Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TIIS)},
year = {2018},
publisher = {ACM},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
}


@article{ethanhiltonwaynelitracyhammondjulielinsey2018Journals,
author = {Hilton, Ethan and Li, Wayne and Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {Effectively teaching sketching in engineering curricula},
journal = {International Journal of Engineering Education},
year = {2018},
}


@article{jenniferhorneydanielgoldbergtracyhammondkahlerstonesethsmitherman2017Journals,
author = {Horney, Jennifer and Goldberg, Daniel and Hammond, Tracy and Stone, Kahler and Smitherman, Seth},
title = {Assessing the Prevalence of Risk Factors for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Brazos County, Texas},
journal = {PLOS Current Outbreaks},
volume = {1},
year = {2017},
month = {October 4, },
publisher = {Plos},
address = {San Francisco, CA, USA},
note = {DOI: 10.1371/currents.outbreaks.93540c6c8c7831670591b0264479269c},
}


@article{sethsmithermandanielgoldbergtracyhammondjenniferhorney2017Journals,
author = {Smitherman, Seth and Goldberg, Daniel and Hammond, Tracy and Horney, Jennifer},
title = {A Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response survey to assess the prevalence of risk factors for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Texas},
journal = {Health Security},
volume = {15-3},
pages = {238-243},
year = {2017},
month = {June},
publisher = {IEEE},
address = {Piscataway, NJ, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2326-5094, \url{https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2016.0075}},
}


@article{jaideepraysethpolsleytracyhammond2017Journals,
author = {Ray, Jaideep and Polsley, Seth and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {SketchSeeker : Finding Similar Sketches},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems},
volume = {47-2},
pages = {194-205},
year = {2017},
month = {April},
publisher = {IEEE},
address = {Piscataway, NJ, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2168-2291, \url{https://doi.org/10.1109/THMS.2017.2649684}},
}


@article{folamialamudunhongjunyoonkathleenhudsongarnettamorinducotetracyhammondgeorgiatourassi2017Journals,
author = {Alamudun, Folami and Yoon, Hong-Jun and Hudson, Kathleen and Morin-Ducote, Garnetta and Hammond, Tracy and Tourassi, Georgia},
title = {Fractal Analysis of Visual Search Activity for Mass Detection During Mammographic Screening},
journal = {Medical Physics },
volume = {44-3},
pages = {832-846},
year = {2017},
month = {February 21,},
publisher = {Wiley},
address = {Hoboken, NJ, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2473-4209, \url{http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mp.12100}},
}


@article{shiqiangguofolamialamuduntracyhammond2016Journals,
author = {Guo, Shiqiang (Frank) and Alamudun, Folami and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {R\`esuMatcher: A personalized r\`esum\`e-job matching system},
journal = {Expert Systems with Applications},
volume = {60},
pages = {169-182},
year = {2016},
month = {October 30,},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 0957-4174, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eswa.2016.04.013}},
}


@article{vijayrajannapatrickvojerrybarthmatthewmjeldetrevorgraycassandraoduolatracyhammond2016Journals,
author = {Rajanna, Vijay and Vo, Patrick and Barth, Jerry and Mjelde, Matthew and Gray, Trevor and Oduola, Cassandra and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {KinoHaptics: An Automated, Wearable, Haptic Assisted, Physio-therapeutic System for Post-surgery Rehabilitation and Self-care},
journal = {Journal of Medical Systems},
volume = {40-3},
pages = {1-12},
year = {2016},
month = {March},
publisher = {Springer},
address = {Heidelberg, Germany},
note = {ISSN: 0148-5598, \url{https://doi.org/10.1007/s10916-015-0391-3}},
}


@article{stephanievalentinetracyhammond2016Journals,
author = {Valentine, Stephanie and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {An Analysis of Participation, Identity Conversations, and Social Networking Affordances on an Online Social Network for Children},
journal = {Journal of Media Innovations},
volume = {3-1},
pages = {41-62},
year = {2016},
publisher = {University of Oslo Library},
address = {Oslo, Norway},
note = {ISSN: 1894-5562, \url{http://dx.doi.org/10.5617/jmi.v3i1.2516}},
}


@article{manojprasadmuratrusselltracyhammond2014Journals,
author = {Prasad, Manoj and Russell, Murat and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Designing Vibrotactile Codes to Communicate Verb Phrases},
journal = {ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMM)},
volume = {11-1},
pages = {11:1--11:21},
year = {2014},
month = {September},
publisher = {ACM},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1551-6857, \url{http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2637289}},
}


@article{funmiatilolastephanievalentinehonghoekimdavidturnererinmctiguetracyhammondjulielinsey2014Journals,
author = {Atilola, Olufunmilola and Valentine, Stephanie and Kim, Hong-Hoe (Ayden) and Turner, David and McTigue, Erin and Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {Mechanix: A natural sketch interface tool for teaching truss analysis and free-body diagrams},
journal = {Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (AIEDAM)},
volume = {28-2},
pages = {169-192},
year = {2014},
month = {May},
publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1469-1760, \url{https://doi.org/10.1017/S0890060414000079}},
}


@article{tracyhammondjulielinsey2014Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {Design Computing and Cognition (DCC'12) Special Issue},
journal = {Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (AIEDAM)},
volume = {28-2},
pages = {113-114},
year = {2014},
month = {May},
publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1469-1760, \url{https://doi.org/10.1017/S089006041400002X}},
}


@article{tracyhammondjulielinsey2013Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Linsey, Julie},
title = {AIEDAM Special Issue Call For Papers, May 2014, Vol. 28, No. 2},
journal = {Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing},
volume = {27-1},
pages = {83-84},
year = {2013},
month = {February},
publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 1469-1760, \url{https://doi.org/10.1017/S089006041200039X}},
}


@article{stephanievalentinefranciscovidesgeorgelucchesedavidturnerhonghoekimwenzhelijulielinseytracyhammond2013Journals,
author = {Valentine, Stephanie and Vides, Francisco and Lucchese, George and Turner, David and Kim, Hong-Hoe (Ayden) and Li, Wenzhe and Linsey, Julie and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Mechanix: A Sketch-Based Tutoring and Grading System for Free-Body Diagrams},
journal = {AI Magazine},
volume = {34-1},
pages = {55-66},
year = {2013},
month = {January},
publisher = {AAAI Press},
address = {Palo Alto, CA, USA},
note = {\url{https://doi.org/10.1609/aimag.v34i1.2437}},
}


@article{tracyhammondbrandonpaulson2011Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Paulson, Brandon},
title = {Recognizing Sketched Multistroke Primitives},
journal = {ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TIIS)},
volume = {1-4},
pages = {1-34},
year = {2011},
month = {October},
publisher = {ACM},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
note = {ISSN: 2160-6455, \url{http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2030365.2030369}},
}


@article{brandonpaulsondaniellecummingstracyhammond2011Journals,
author = {Paulson, Brandon and Cummings, Danielle and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Object Interaction Detection Using Hand Posture Cues in an Office Setting},
journal = {International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS)},
volume = {69-1},
pages = {19-29},
year = {2011},
month = {January},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 1071-5819, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhcs.2010.09.003}},
}


@article{gennarocostagliolatracyhammondberylplimmer2010Journals,
author = {Costagliola, Gennaro and Hammond, Tracy and Plimmer, Beryl},
title = {Editorial: JVLC Special Issue on Sketch Computation},
journal = {Journal of Visual Languages \& Computing (JVLC)},
volume = {21-2},
pages = {67-68},
year = {2010},
month = {April},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 1045-926X, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvlc.2010.01.003}},
}


@article{paultaeletracyhammond2010Journals,
author = {Taele, Paul and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {LAMPS: A Sketch Recognition-Based Teaching Tool for Mandarin Phonetic Symbols I},
journal = {Journal of Visual Languages \& Computing (JLVC)},
volume = {21-2},
pages = {109-120},
year = {2010},
month = {April},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {ISSN: 1045-926X, \url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvlc.2009.12.004}},
}


@article{brandonpaulsontracyhammond2008Journals,
author = {Paulson, Brandon and Hammond, Tracy},
title = {Marqs: Retrieving Sketches Learned from a Single Example Using a Dual-Classifier},
journal = {Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces},
volume = {2-1},
pages = {3-11},
year = {2008},
month = {May},
publisher = {Springer-Verlag},
address = {Heidelberg, Germany},
note = {ISSN: 1783-8738, \url{https://doi.org/10.1007/s12193-008-0006-0}},
}


@article{tracyhammondrandalldavis2005Journals,
author = {Hammond, Tracy and Davis, Randall},
title = {LADDER, A Sketching Language for User Interface Developers},
journal = {Computers \& Graphics},
volume = {29-4},
pages = {518-532},
year = {2005},
month = {August},
publisher = {Elsevier},
address = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
note = {\url{https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cag.2005.05.005}},
}


Show All Latex Include

\subsection{Journals}

\subsubsection{Journals}
\begin{enumerate}
\item \bibentry{tracyhammondshaliniashokkumarmatthewrunyonjoshcherianblakewillifordswarnakeshavabhotlastephanievalentinewaynelijulielinsey2018Journals}
\item \bibentry{ethanhiltonwaynelitracyhammondjulielinsey2018Journals}
\item \bibentry{jenniferhorneydanielgoldbergtracyhammondkahlerstonesethsmitherman2017Journals}
\item \bibentry{sethsmithermandanielgoldbergtracyhammondjenniferhorney2017Journals}
\item \bibentry{jaideepraysethpolsleytracyhammond2017Journals}
\item \bibentry{folamialamudunhongjunyoonkathleenhudsongarnettamorinducotetracyhammondgeorgiatourassi2017Journals}
\item \bibentry{shiqiangguofolamialamuduntracyhammond2016Journals}
\item \bibentry{vijayrajannapatrickvojerrybarthmatthewmjeldetrevorgraycassandraoduolatracyhammond2016Journals}
\item \bibentry{stephanievalentinetracyhammond2016Journals}
\item \bibentry{manojprasadmuratrusselltracyhammond2014Journals}
\item \bibentry{funmiatilolastephanievalentinehonghoekimdavidturnererinmctiguetracyhammondjulielinsey2014Journals}
\item \bibentry{tracyhammondjulielinsey2014Journals}
\item \bibentry{tracyhammondjulielinsey2013Journals}
\item \bibentry{stephanievalentinefranciscovidesgeorgelucchesedavidturnerhonghoekimwenzhelijulielinseytracyhammond2013Journals}
\item \bibentry{tracyhammondbrandonpaulson2011Journals}
\item \bibentry{brandonpaulsondaniellecummingstracyhammond2011Journals}
\item \bibentry{gennarocostagliolatracyhammondberylplimmer2010Journals}
\item \bibentry{paultaeletracyhammond2010Journals}
\item \bibentry{brandonpaulsontracyhammond2008Journals}
\item \bibentry{tracyhammondrandalldavis2005Journals}
\end{enumerate}